Govt  nods yes for  ₹12k  crore to push green energy

The funds will be used for phase II of the national clean energy corridor.
The project is intended to assist India in meeting its climate commitments made at the COP-26 summit in Glasgow.

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Government approves Green energy funds

The government approved a 12,031 crore plan on Thursday to build infrastructure to transmit electricity generated by renewable energy projects as part of its efforts to increase output from green sources and meet half of the nation's energy needs from them by 2030.
The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA) approved the investment for the second phase of the green energy corridor, which will help supply 20 gigatonnes (GW) of renewable energy to the national grid from Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, and Uttar Pradesh.
The project is intended to assist India in meeting its climate commitments made at the COP-26 summit in Glasgow.

At the November summit, Prime Minister Narendra Modi pledged to increase the country's non-fossil fuel power generation capacity to 500GW and to meet half of the country's energy needs from renewable sources by the end of the decade.
According to the Central Electricity Authority, India's power demand will increase to 817GW by 2030.

According to a statement from the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, the second phase of the green energy corridor project will include the addition of approximately 10,750 circuit kilometres (ckm) of transmission lines and 27,500 megavolt-amperes (MVA) transformation capacity of substations.
"This will promote environmentally sustainable growth and contribute to the country's long-term energy security." "Raj Kumar Singh, the Union Minister for Power, New and Renewable Energy, stated in a tweet.

"Today's CCEA decision strengthens India's efforts to meet the 450GW target in the renewable energy sector." Other advantages include increased energy security and environmentally friendly growth "Modi stated this in a tweet.
The corridor is expected to aid in ensuring that the massive injection of electricity into the national grid from intermittent energy sources such as solar and wind does not jeopardise the grid.

The corridor is an important part of the plan to keep the grid frequency between 49.90 and 50.05 Hz (hertz). A recently operational automatic generation control sends signals to power plants every four seconds to maintain frequency, ensuring the reliability of the power grid.

The project will receive $3,970.34 crore in central funding, or one-third of the total project cost. The transmission systems will be built over a five-year period ending March 31, 2026, according to the government.

The green energy corridor's first phase is being implemented in Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Rajasthan, and Tamil Nadu. It will contribute to the supply of approximately 24GW of renewable energy by 2022.
The first phase will add 9,700km of transmission lines and 22,600MVA capacity substations at a cost of Rs 10,141.68 crore, according to the statement. The Union Ministries of Power and New and Renewable Energy recently approved 23 inter-state transmission system projects totaling Rs 15,893 crore. India has met its nationally determined contribution target, with 157.32GW of non-fossil-based installed energy capacity, accounting for 40.1 percent of total installed electricity capacity. Solar, wind, and hydropower account for 48.55GW, 40.03GW, and 51.34GW of this total, respectively. India's installed nuclear energy-based electricity capacity is 6.78GW. The government approved a 12,031 crore plan on Thursday to build infrastructure to transmit electricity generated by renewable energy projects as it seeks to increase output from green sources and meet half of the nation's energy needs from them by 2030.
The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs (CCEA) approved the investment for the second phase of the green energy corridor, which will help supply 20 gigatonnes (GW) of renewable energy to the national grid from Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala, Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, and Uttar Pradesh.

The project is intended to assist India in meeting its climate commitments made at the COP-26 summit in Glasgow.

At the November summit, Prime Minister Narendra Modi pledged to increase the country's non-fossil fuel power generation capacity to 500GW and to meet half of the country's energy needs from renewable sources by the end of the decade.
According to the Central Electricity Authority, India's power demand will increase to 817GW by 2030.

According to a statement from the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, the second phase of the green energy corridor project will include the addition of approximately 10,750 circuit kilometres (ckm) of transmission lines and 27,500 megavolt-amperes (MVA) transformation capacity of substations.
"This will promote environmentally sustainable growth and contribute to the country's long-term energy security." "Raj Kumar Singh, the Union Minister for Power, New and Renewable Energy, stated in a tweet.

"Today's CCEA decision strengthens India's efforts to meet the 450GW target in the renewable energy sector." Other advantages include increased energy security and environmentally friendly growth "Modi stated this in a tweet.

The corridor is expected to aid in ensuring that the massive injection of electricity into the national grid from intermittent energy sources such as solar and wind does not jeopardise the grid.

The corridor is an important part of the plan to keep the grid frequency between 49.90 and 50.05 Hz (hertz). A recently operational automatic generation control sends signals to power plants every four seconds to maintain frequency, ensuring the reliability of the power grid.
The project will receive $3,970.34 crore in central funding, or one-third of the total project cost. The transmission systems will be built over a five-year period ending March 31, 2026, according to the government.

The green energy corridor's first phase is being implemented in Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Rajasthan, and Tamil Nadu. It will contribute to the supply of approximately 24GW of renewable energy by 2022.

The first phase will add 9,700km of transmission lines and 22,600MVA capacity substations at a cost of Rs 10,141.68 crore, according to the statement. The Union Ministries of Power and New and Renewable Energy recently approved 23 inter-state transmission system projects totaling Rs 15,893 crore. India has met its nationally determined contribution target, with 157.32GW of non-fossil-based installed energy capacity, accounting for 40.1 percent of total installed electricity capacity. Solar, wind, and hydropower account for 48.55GW, 40.03GW, and 51.34GW of this total, respectively. India's installed nuclear energy-based electricity capacity is 6.78GW.